Baltimore Orioles fall big to New York

The Baltimore Orioles’ string of luck so to speak against the New York Mets came to an end last night. And as has been the case with so many things this year, it seemingly happened in grandiose fashion. Dylan Bundy got knocked around a bit, and as we know it all begins and ends with starting pitching. Bundy’s line: 5.1 IP, 11 H, 7 R, 0 BB, 5 K.

New York came out swinging, and for their sake it’s a good thing they did. After they took a 2-0 lead in the first inning, Adam Jones‘ RBI-single in the bottom of the inning brought the Orioles back to within one at 2-1. But that was as close as the Birds would get in the game. Bautista would add an RBI-single in the fourth, and Nimmo an RBI-double. An inning later Frazier would smack a solo homer, opening the game wide open at 5-1.

As if that wasn’t enough, New York put up a nine-run sixth inning. Yes folks, you read that right – a nine-run sixth inning. Whatever Oriole pitching was throwing up there, New York was hitting. It was capped off by a grand slam off the bat of Plawecki. You can chalk this up to it’s part of the rebuilding process, but nine-run innings are tough to come by.

The Birds however would come back – just a bit. Mark Trumbo‘s RBI-single in the seventh cut it to 14-2. An inning later Austin Wynns would add an RBI-double, and Jonathan Villar a solo home run. For what it’s worth, that was the 97th home run in the history of Camden Yards to make it onto Eutaw Street. However just for good measure, NY decided to tack on a three-run homer by Flores in the ninth, to run the final to 16-5. As I said, whatever Oriole pitching was throwing up there last night, New York was hitting.

The sad thing is that the Orioles did rattle New York’s starter (Wheeler) a bit in the first two innings. They got a few runners on base, and he appeared on the verge of potentially being on the ropes. At this point you can chalk that up to a lot of inexperienced players being in the lineup. And yes, that’s part of a rebuild.

However it’s also been the case for most of the season. Even when the Schoop’s and Machado’s of the world were with the Orioles, it seemed that the Orioles were in a sense letting opposing pitchers off the hook. Part of any sport is having the eye of the tiger. The good news now is that the eye of the tiger can be learned. But at some point along the way it seemingly went by the wayside.

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